Colours Of The Night

Although moths are largely creatures of the night and could perhaps be expected to be drab in appearance, in fact they range from plain black or white to colours that can be subtle or brilliant. Wing patterns too can be cryptic or flamboyant, size can be from tiny to large, and the following images illustrate some of the moths displaying these characteristics that can be highlights of a night’s mothing.

The Wingia genus, (Oecophoridae) has eight Australian members of which three have been photographed locally, they are always a delight to see come to the light.

Wingia aurata.

Wingia hesperidella.

Wingia lambertella.

Aeolochroma metarhodata, the Tea-tree Emerald (Geometrinae) can be quite variable, these two images show some beautiful subtle colour.

Anything but subtle, the Showy Geometrid, Niceteria macrocosma,

And the Bright Geometrid, Lychnographa agaura, both from the Nacophorini.

The latter species photographed on the forest floor.

A tiny jewel to conclude, Cebysa leucotelus, (Psychidae) a pristine male photographed on a window pane, click image to enlarge.

 

Lasiocampidae #6.

Porela.

Ten Victorian species, of which five may occur in the local area. So far however only one has come to the light, Porela delineata, a state wide species, the larvae of which feed on Eucalypt and Leptospermum foliage. This attractive moth is a frequent visitor to the light, on the wing mainly in the warmer months, only males have been photographed.

Click last image to enlarge.

Reference and further reading,
Moths of Victoria Volume 1.